The Slippery Slope: What Can Happen When Contractors Fail To Practice Due Diligence

essayez ceci We were asked to perform a geotechnical investigation at a property in Temecula, CA, to assess damage and prepare repair recommendations for a pool, retaining wall and patio system. Damage was caused by settlement of improperly compacted fill dirt and the movement of slope soils. Cracks and separations in the retaining walls up to about 1.5-inches wide were visible. Continue reading

Owner Alert: More Building Code Changes

meilleur site gratuit pour rencontre sexe Wooden apartment balconies will require periodic inspections in California by 2025.

If you’re an owner or investor in an apartment building or an officer in a home owners association, which at the time of sale met all the building code requirements with all the paperwork in order, you might think that’s the end of the story.

Think again because, unfortunately, building and civil codes in California and elsewhere have a way of evolving and changing over time, which frequently requires new inspections and property maintenance.

A case in point: We were recently asked to evaluate an HOA community’s buildings and see if they were affected by California SB 721 and/or Civil Code Section 5551.

can i buy Pregabalin online KEY PROVISIONS OF SENATE BILL 721
The bill (approved by the Governor on September 17, 2018) requires an inspection of “exterior elevated elements and associated waterproofing elements… including decks and balconies for buildings with three or more multi-family dwellings…” These inspections are to be performed, by a licensed engineer or architect, by a qualified building contractor, or by a qualified building inspector, before January 1, 2025.

The bill applies to apartment buildings, but not to hotels/motels and “common interest developments” such as HOA’s. The bill, however, authorizes a local governing entity to enact stricter requirements, and some will do so before the SB721 deadline.

Exterior elevated elements that are subject to this requirement include those building elements that are supported (in whole or substantial part) by wood members, are more than 6-feet above the ground surface, are outside the building envelope, and are designed for human occupancy or use.

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How Far Would You Go To Feel Secure?

How far would you go to feel secure in your home? In one of our latest projects, we’re working for a client who is going to build his dream home on a gorgeous view lot. The lot overlooks homes that have settlement problems. In fact, he owns one of the homes that is suffering from settlement.

Knowing the history of the soil around his view lot, he is concerned that he could run into the same settlement problems with this lot. The question now is, how far will he go to feel secure? He wants the foundation for his new home to be strong enough so that it will never settle.

For example, the concrete contractor’s bid is for a 5 inch foundation. The contractor said that in his experience, 5 inch foundations are strong enough to address this situation. The client asked if a 6 inch foundation would be better. The contractor said 5 inches was enough. The client said let’s make it 6 inches to be safe.

If you are in this situation what would you do? Do you have limitless amounts of money? Have you researched your contractors and trust their qualifications?

Feeling secure about your property is paramount. So, do your research and find contractors you trust. They are the experts and will be able to help you find the best solution.